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Street Style: London Fashion Week FW 23′

Street Style: London Fashion Week FW 23′

As Milan Fashion Week is currently underway, we thought we would look back at some of the stellar street-style from LFW. London is known for its eccentric, punk sensibility and with its chilly weather — coats! Letterman jackets, a Coi Leray sighting, Hanifa boots, check, leather, the street style this fall/winter 2023 season has been quite impressive, and London didn’t disappoint.

Spotted trends; tons of vibrant colors, moto-jackets, oversized blazers, elevated athleisure, boots mixed with comfy sneakers, mules and crocs, and just an underlining understated cool edge.

Street Style: London Fashion Week FW 23′
LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 19: A guest wears yellow square sunglasses, a gold necklace, a red bra underwear, a navy blue striped print pattern cropped blazer jacket, a neon green long coat, a khaki large handbag from JW Anderson, black striped print pattern large suit pants, white shiny leather pointed pumps heels shoes , outside Erdem, during London Fashion Week February 2023 on February 19, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Edward Berthelot/Getty Images)
Street Style: London Fashion Week FW 23′
LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 19: Coi Leray wears grey pleated mini skirt, blue sleeveless top with dolphine print, white socks, sneakers, sunglasses outside JW Anderson during London Fashion Week February 2023 on February 19, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Christian Vierig/Getty Images)

See some of the looks from London Fashion Week, below.

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See All the Best Looks From the Runway

The third leg of Fashion Month officially began in Milan on Wednesday February 22 and from now until February 27th, the Italian fashion capital will host over 50 IRL presentations featuring the usual heavy hitters like Prada, Gucci, Ferragamo, Fendi, and Diesel—the latter two having presented on the very first afternoon of Milan Fashion Week. At Fendi, Kim Jones flexed his affinity for exacting tailoring and experimented with cutouts on workday-ready ensembles. Taking in the collection, which was inspired by Delfina Delettrez Fendi’s personal style, was none other than Donatella Versace who has chosen to skip her usual slot on the Italian calendar and will be presenting her latest collection in Los Angeles in March. Meanwhile, Diesel’s creative director Glenn Martens seized the moment as this season’s opener to kick things off with a bang: A mountain of 200,000 boxes of Durex condoms and a risqué soundtrack provided the backdrop for his fall 2023 offering.

As for the rest of the week: Marco de Vincenzo showed his sophomore effort for Etro, as did Maximilian Davis at Ferragamo. And Gucci, which is sans creative director until Sabato De Sarno’s debut in September, put out a colorful collection created by its in-house design team on February 24. For all of the highlights from Milan’s top runways, follow along here.

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

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Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

Giovanni Giannoni/WWD/Getty Images

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How Kanye, Gap, and Chanel Are Dressing Us Down for Dystopia

If the world feels terrible right now, one can take small comfort in the cultural history of dystopia being a long one. From George Orwell’s 1984 to cinema franchises like Mad Max, fiction has interrogated what it would be like if we ever hit that point of dystopia or a borderline to present apocalypse. This idea of “the end of life as we know it” has long influenced the cultural zeitgeist, including fashion.

One example is the recent drop of Kanye West’s Yeezy Gap Engineered by Balenciaga collection. Business of Fashion credited Yeezy Gap Engineered by Balenciaga with bringing a dystopian retail experience to stores. Rather than the traditional well-merchandised, well-sized, particularly laid out approach to visual merchandising Gap takes, the Yeezy collection was available… in trash bags.

Did this deter many customers from shopping? Not at all. Shoppers waited hours in line to shop to purchase T-shirts and hoodies, many of which are now sold out in most sizes. The shopping area for the collection consisted of limited space with black floors and black walls, and customers recreating the scene of dumpster diving. It was dystopia at its most capitalist.

Despite the Yeezy Gap Engineered by Balenciaga collection nearly selling out, some aren’t as happy with this dystopian concept as one might think. Mike Grillo, a customer who recently shopped at Gap after the Yeezy Gap Engineered by Balenciaga launch, said, “We need to stop pretending Yeezy Gap is a thing. It’s literally trash bags full of black hoodies flopped in the center of your average gap [products.] Spare us. I also overheard a sales associate saying Yeezy Gap is the same materials Balenciaga uses, and I bet you my retirement fund it’s not.”

In an e-mail to The Daily Beast, Gap said that Yeezy Gap and Balenciaga,

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