metal detector

Metal detectors banned from wedding ring search on Costa Blanca beach in Spain

DETECTORISTS have criticised a ban from a Costa Blanca council on looking for a missing wedding ring on a beach with a metal detector.

A woman lost the ring on Guardamar’s Playa Centro on July 25.

Guardamar council passed a local law in August 2021 which banned searches for objects and coins with metal detectors ‘under sands or dunes to protect archaeological sites close to municipality beaches’.

Law breakers face a fine of up to €200.

The woman desperately tried to find the ring on her own and then resorted to contacting the Valencian Association of Detectoaficionados to see if one of their members could help.

The group was aware of the Guardamar law and contacted the council for permission to use a metal detector at an exact location where the lady saw her ring fall into the sand.

The council refused to budge which means the ring is lost for good.

The Association slammed the decision saying the council ‘puts archaeological remains which do not reach the depth of a metal detector above the possible benefit of cleaning metallic and dangerous garbage for beach users’.

It added that it was disappointed residents and tourists are not allowed to use detectors to recover objects of great sentimental value.

They also queried what exact archaeological work is being carried out, if any, at Guardamar’s Playa Centro.

READ MORE:

metal-detectors-banned-from-wedding-ring-search-on-costa-blanca-beach-in-spain/”/council passed a local law in August 2021 which banned searches for objects and coins with metal detectors ‘under sands or dunes to protect archaeological sites close to municipality beaches’.Law breakers face a fine of up to €200.The woman desperately tried to find the ring on her own and then resorted to contacting the Valencian Association of Detectoaficionados to see if one of their members could help.The group was aware of

Read the rest

Santa Rosa man took off his ring to give his dog a bath 21 years ago and thought he’d lost it forever. Destiny had other ideas

This is the story of a lost ring, a desperate search and a dog named Sushi.

It’s also the story of serendipity, friendship and luck.

But perhaps, above all, it’s the story of enduring love and beshert — a Yiddish word that means, among other things, destiny.

It is a story that has been more than 50 years in the making, but we’ll begin last month when Hank Trione was doing yard work at his Santa Rosa home.

‘It went flying’

There was some ground cover near the front walkway that he wanted gone, and he gave one stubborn bunch a tug.

Up came the root, and with it an 8-inch knot of earth.

And the aforementioned ring.

“When I pulled the root out, it went flying,” Trione said. “It must have been entangled in the root.”

Trione put it in his pocket and kept working.

Only later did he look more closely at his find.

“I cleaned it up with an old toothbrush,” he said. “I could tell it was engraved, but my eyes aren’t what they used to be.”

He aimed his phone at the engraving and blew it up. Nope. Then he called in his 17-year-old daughter for backup.

Together, they could make out four engraved letters: B-a-r-b. And a date: 8-6-72.

Curious, Trione decided to dig up something else: The file, replete with ownership documents and pulled permits from past owners, that he got when he bought the house on East Foothill Drive four years ago.

The previous owner’s name wasn’t Barbara, but the owners before that were Barbara and Gary Greensweig.

Trione knew where to go next.

Lynn and Gary Leopold have lived in the house across the street since 1986. They have been neighbors and friends with the Greensweigs now for more

Read the rest